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No one wants a scratched disc!

Scratches and scuffs can cause playability issues on all types of optical media, including CDs, DVDs, Blu-rays and game discs.

Unlike a record player which uses a needle, or a tape player which uses a magnetic head, optical media players use a laser. Any physical marring of the plastic layer which protects the data on the disc can interfere with the laser’s ability to read the data.

The good news is that discs can be restored; all we need to do is remove the scratches.

See the factsheet on scratches.


Restoring Discs to Like-New

To restore a disc to like-new condition, the protective plastic layer needs to be polished down to the depth of the deepest scratch. Both the Hybrid 2.0 and the VMI 2500 use a micro-abrasive solution in combination with a buffing process to accomplish this. Depending on how badly scratched the disc is, this can usually be accomplished in about 30 seconds to 4 minutes.

To speed up the repair process, a disc sander can be used before polishing. The QuickSand cuts away some of the worst scratches in just ten seconds. Disc media resellers and libraries with large collections find that using the QuickSand speeds up operations by reducing the amount of time it takes to repair badly damaged discs.

Although polishing a disc does remove a little of the disc surface, it’s only a few microns of depth. This means that, if required, a disc can safely be repaired many times over. This is especially important for video rental stores and libraries looking to actively extend the circulation life of their disc media.

See the factsheet on disc restoration.


Understanding Disc Layers

The composition of discs varies greatly depending on the disc format. Of course, the most important layer is the data layer, which holds digital information and must be intact for the disc to play.

The arrangement of layers affects the likelihood of damage and determines the best repair method.

See the factsheet on disc layers.


Disc Damage: What can and can’t be repaired?

The composition of discs varies greatly depending on the disc format. Of course, the most important layer is the data layer, which holds digital information and must be intact for the disc to play.

The arrangement of layers affects the likelihood of damage and determines the best repair method.

See the fact sheet on disc damage.


Selecting the Right Machine for your Business

A disc repair machine is an investment in your business. Taking the time to learn about the different models will help you to make an informed choice.
See our equipment on a comparison chart here.

 

Factsheets and content on this page reproduced with permission of our partner, Total Disc Repair, UK.